Promoting the Beauty of Natural Hair | BU Today

Gerard Ortiz

Student club BU The natural way fosters group with conversations, fingers-on occasions

On a latest weeknight, mannequin heads with a wide variety of curly and kinky hair are clipped to desks in a Higher education of Arts & Sciences classroom. Tiny clusters of pupils get close to every head, having turns grabbing strands of the mannequins’ hair, slowly functioning their way down the heads at the demonstration and course on braiding hair hosted by BU In a natural way, a pupil club devoted to marketing the elegance of natural hair. 

Founded in 2019, the club grew out of what experienced been the Boston College chapter of Campus Curlz, a nationwide organic hair and company-dependent group. With the aim of fostering a neighborhood that speaks to the rising range of tradition and hair types on campus, members decided to department off on their have. 

BU In a natural way hosts activities built to empower folks with curly and coily hair to embrace their organic hair and all the forms it comes in.

All through the pandemic, club president Naomi Boye (Questrom’22) held the firm heading by web hosting weekly digital Curl Chats masking a range of topics, which made a space for folks to explore natural hair and its intersection with latest events. The chats proved so preferred they determined to continue them the moment in-man or woman conferences resumed. At a the latest session, users talked about the affect of the CROWN Act—a bill just lately passed by the Massachusetts Legislature—on promoting inclusivity. 

The club worked to make sure that observe mannequins have a range of textures to emphasize the value of remaining equipped to style a selection of different hair styles (still left photograph). Tatiana Anderson (CAS’22) (heart) teaches braiding to N’Sikan Keendow (Questrom’25) (from left), Daniela Baez (CAS’25), Axum Afework (CAS’25), and Abigail Mureithi (CAS’25) throughout a braiding demonstration hosted by In a natural way BU (suitable photograph).

“I assume that a significant section of BU In a natural way is that it is variety of the first spot that a good deal of Black ladies on campus will arrive to try out and make new buddies, mainly because there is this kind of a bond more than hair inside the Black local community,” Boye suggests. “We’re contributing to the normalization of donning diverse organic hairstyles.” 

In addition to Curl Chats, BU Naturally maintains a weblog to maintain users abreast of all-natural hair news and discourse, potential customers area trips to area natural beauty source stores, and hosts fingers-on-functions, like the live hair braiding 101 demo. Most meetings attract extra than a dozen college students, even though even bigger occasions provide in a lot greater crowds. 

Tatiana Anderson (CAS’22), the demo’s hair braiding “pro,” wanders the room, halting to guide everyone who looks to be struggling. She has been braiding hair because she was 7 and even ran a tiny hair organization on campus. Anderson wished to share that know-how with the club just before she graduated. “A lot of people are coming from property, much absent, and don’t know how to do their hair,” she says. “I actually truly feel like it is important that anytime you have awareness, or some thing, just to share it for the reason that you never know what someone can do with that.”

Programming chair Camille Ofulue (CAS’24) says hair styling occasions like this are essential on a campus like BU. “There’s a whole lot of strain to search a selected way and which is not often achievable in this setting. For example, if you live in a dorm, you simply cannot clean your hair every single week in the communal lavatory, but you can get a established of braids that will past you a lengthy time.” 


A massive section of BU Obviously is that it’s kind of the 1st spot that a ton of Black girls on campus will appear to test and make new close friends, for the reason that there is this sort of a bond over hair within the Black community.

Naomi Boye, club president 

The hair braiding 101 course is the first time Tatiana Jose-Santos (CAS’23) attended a BU In a natural way conference. She observed the club’s marketing on Instagram and figured it was her opportunity to understand far more. “I can do cornrows [on myself], but I’m really interested in discovering how to do different variations, like box braids,” she says. 

The party even drew several male students, who attended out of curiosity.

“I believe as a Black person, it’s significant for us to acquire our know-how, and I imagine braiding your very own hair, that’s seriously interesting,” states N’Sikan Keendow (Questrom’25). “If you can [braid] on your possess, that is kinda like getting some ability for you. Not each and every Black man can braid hair. The fact that I can study listed here, with other Black learners on campus, I sense like that’s truly promoting our tradition and neighborhood on campus.”

Mackenzie Bower (CAS’22), one of the handful of at the meeting with out noticeably curly hair, claims that her principal determination for signing up for the club is to acquire a much better knowing of her good friends. Raking her fingers via her mannequin’s hair, she states it would be enjoyment to be equipped to do her friends’ hair every single now and then.

Boye hopes to see the club improve and continue on to be a useful resource on campus. “A large amount of people today [with] various backgrounds choose desire in our club,” she says. “I come to feel like we’re equipped to present a area where by people can come to feel accepted, though also marking our space in just the wider BU community.” 

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